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Real Estate Foundation Greenprint Partners With ULI

by Shilpi Paul

Real Estate Foundation Greenprint Partners With ULI: Figure 1

In eco-friendly real estate news, the Urban Land Institute recently announced a partnership with the Greenprint Foundation, creating the ULI Greenprint Center For Building Performance. Greenprint, an alliance of green-minded real estate owners, investors, financial institutions and other industry folks, has been trying to find ways to decrease the carbon footprint of the “built” environment since 2009.

From Charles B. Leitner III, the new chairman of the ULI Greenprint Center:

“I see the ULI Greenprint Center’s work as becoming the global real estate industry’s diary of its efforts to dramatically lower the impact of buildings on the environment. We will continue to promote increased awareness of innovative technologies and best operating practices to reduce energy consumption and carbon emissions. Through this center, ULI can help position the land use and real estate industry as part of the solution to climate change.”

In other Urban Land Institute news, Senior Fellow John McIlwain found some data to support his prediction that energy efficient design is becoming standard.

McIlwain, Terwilliger Chair for Housing at the Institute, noted some early signs that energy efficient features are becoming the new normal; new home construction in Phoenix with greener features are now selling at higher prices than existing homes and energy-efficient rentals are snatched up faster and experience less turnover. In line with conventional wisdom on the subject, McIlwain believes that the next generation of buyers will be demanding net-zero and net-plus homes.

See other articles related to: urban land institute, green real estate dc

This article originally published at http://dc.urbanturf.com/articles/blog/real_estate_industry_gets_greener/4969

1 Comment

  1. xmal said at 9:34 pm on Monday January 23, 2012:
    "In line with conventional wisdom on the subject, McIlwain believes that the next generation of buyers will be demanding net-zero and net-plus homes." That depends on when this next generation is going to be renting. I know California is aiming for all net-zero residential construction by 2020, but are there any buildings that meet that standard now? What about other states?

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