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This Week’s Find: Hidden in Bloomingdale, Two Carriage Houses Became One

by Nena Perry-Brown

This Week's Find: Hidden in Bloomingdale, Two Carriage Houses Became One: Figure 1
113 Bloomingdale Court NW. Click to enlarge.

This Week's Find is a carriage house that was transformed over the years from an abandoned shell to a Euro-style industrial loft. The Bloomingdale alley property was originally constructed as two carriage houses in 1909, which were eventually abandoned and ceded to the city's ownership. 

This Week's Find: Hidden in Bloomingdale, Two Carriage Houses Became One: Figure 2
Click to enlarge.

At some point, the buildings were purchased by a woman who hired architect Eric Gronning to combine them. This owner, known as the "modern Martha Stewart", used the property as a work/live unit, residing on the upper level while running catering and printing businesses on the ground level.

This Week's Find: Hidden in Bloomingdale, Two Carriage Houses Became One: Figure 3
Living room. Click to enlarge.

When the current owners purchased the property in 2005, the sole ground floor entrance was a garage door, a ship's ladder was the only access to the upper floor, and half of the space was completely filled with printing presses. Leianne Clements used her design background to reimagine and refurbish the interior.

This Week's Find: Hidden in Bloomingdale, Two Carriage Houses Became One: Figure 4
Kitchen. Click to enlarge.

The building's original concrete floors on the main level were refinished and hardwood floors on the upper level were repurposed from an old schoolhouse. The original brick walls and wooden beam ceilings were restored, and scrap metal was incorporated into the accents and custom stainless steel doors and panels.

This Week's Find: Hidden in Bloomingdale, Two Carriage Houses Became One: Figure 5
Dining area. Click to enlarge.

The minimalist kitchen has clerestory windows, stainless steel countertops and commercial-grade appliances, including an indoor grill and glass door refrigerator. One of two stairs in the house, the main stairwell sits behind a steel-framed custom glass wall.

This Week's Find: Hidden in Bloomingdale, Two Carriage Houses Became One: Figure 6
Master bedroom. Click to enlarge.

Stainless steel barn doors conceal the massive bedroom suites, each of which have built-out closets behind frosted doors and exposed beam ceilings. The master bath is particularly luxurious containing a jetted tub, heated floors and glass-enclosed rainshower. The master suite also has a partitioned office and bedroom-sized walk-in closet and dressing room. The house has access to the roof deck, which was previously planned as a green roof.

This Week's Find: Hidden in Bloomingdale, Two Carriage Houses Became One: Figure 7
Click to enlarge.

More details and images are below.

This Week's Find: Hidden in Bloomingdale, Two Carriage Houses Became One: Figure 8
Second bedroom. Click to enlarge.
This Week's Find: Hidden in Bloomingdale, Two Carriage Houses Became One: Figure 9
Office in master bedroom. Click to enlarge.
This Week's Find: Hidden in Bloomingdale, Two Carriage Houses Became One: Figure 10
Master bath.
  • Address: 113 Bloomingdale Court NW (map)
  • Price: $1,495,000
  • Bedrooms: Two
  • Bathrooms: 2.5
  • Square Feet: 3,200
  • Year Built: 1909
  • Listing Agent: Carlos Garcia, Eng Garcia Grant & Co.

This article originally published at http://dc.urbanturf.com/articles/blog/this-weeks-find-hidden-in-bloomingdale-two-carriage-houses-became-one/14134

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