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A Small Takoma Park Farmhouse For the Worker

by Shilpi Paul

A Small Takoma Park Farmhouse For the Worker: Figure 1
6515 Allegheny Avenue

In the late 1800s, developer Benjamin Franklin Gilbert spent $6,500 for a plot of land to house DC’s growing federal work force. He called the area Takoma Park and began carefully dividing it into parcels. He invited workers to live on the land and build the houses (many of which are large, two-story Queen Anne’s and Bungalows) that now fill the land; this two-bedroom house was originally built in 1920 as a home for one of those workers.

A Small Takoma Park Farmhouse For the Worker: Figure 2
Living Room

The house is small but well crafted with heart of pine floors, a floating, exposed staircase that falls into the living room, and hickory cabinets in the kitchen. The listing also caught our eye because of the very deep backyard, which has an underground river flowing beneath it.

A Small Takoma Park Farmhouse For the Worker: Figure 3
Master Bedroom

A Small Takoma Park Farmhouse For the Worker: Figure 4
Kitchen

A Small Takoma Park Farmhouse For the Worker: Figure 5
Backyard

See other articles related to: takoma park, farmhouse

This article originally published at https://dc.urbanturf.com/articles/blog/small_farmhouse_in_takoma_park_for_the_worker/5120

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