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The 5,589 Units Headed for NoMa

by Nena Perry-Brown

Since the beginning of the year, UrbanTurf has been taking an updated look at what is in the residential development pipeline for neighborhoods around the region. No neighborhood can keep up with the number of residential units in the pipeline for NoMa, though. Below is a rundown of the residential developments set to deliver in and around the neighborhood in the coming years.

If you missed them, here are the other neighborhoods we have covered this year:


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Burnham Place

Akridge’s purchase of the air rights above the rail yards leading to Union Station will eventually lead to the creation of three million square feet of development above the H Street Bridge. The project at First Street and G Place NE (map), named after Union Station architect Daniel Burnham, will yield 1.5 million square feet of office, 100,000 square feet of retail, 500 hotel rooms and over 1,300 residential units. The buildings will stand 90-130 feet above the bridge, and Burnham Place’s completion is intended to make the neighborhood more connected and navigable. The development team also includes Shalom Baranes as architect and as Union Station gets modernized and expanded, will require a lot of coordination with the District Department of Transportation (DDOT), Amtrak, the Union Station Redevelopment Corporation and Union Station Investco as it continues through pre-construction.


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The Lexicon

Formerly 50 Florida Avenue NE (map), The Lexicon Condominiums are scheduled for delivery in 2017. McWilliams|Ballard will commence sales on the 182 units this spring with prices starting in the low $400,000s. The Bush Companies designed, developed and are currently constructing the nine-story condo building which will also have 8,000 square feet of street-level retail. In addition to a gym, clubroom, business center and cascading pool, the building will also provide concierge services and temperature-controlled storage units. There will be enough parking for all of the owners over three underground levels.


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Ava NoMA

AvalonBay Communities is constructing a Ava NoMA, a 13-story building with 438 residential units, at 55 M Street NE (map). The building materials and style are meant to evoke a warehouse, but the amenities are far from industrial, especially as the project will include a 6,700 square-foot retail and food court with dining terrace. Residents will also be able to enjoy a dog wash, fitness center, bicycle shop, and a rooftop deck with pool, billiards and indoor/outdoor cinema. Three underground levels of parking will provide 303 spaces. Sixty-five percent of the units will be studios and one bedrooms, 22 percent will be two bedrooms, and the remainder will be three bedrooms. KTGY is the architect on the project, which is anticipated to open next year.


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Storey Park

First Potomac Realty Trust and Perseus Realty’s mixed-use complex will break ground later this year at the former Greyhound bus terminal and current paved neighborhood park/public art space/outdoor movie venue at 1005 First Street NE (map). Designed by HKS Architects, the development will yield 300 loft apartments overlooking First Street, 65,000 square feet of retail, and 350,000 square feet of office space. The arts will continue to have a home on site, as an upper plaza courtyard will feature a sculpture garden. Amenities will include gyms for both office workers and residents, a rooftop pool and terraces.


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100 K Street NE

WDG Architects and Equity Residential are going to bring a 200,000 square foot, 13-story building to 100 K Street NE (map). Upon completion, there will be 222 residential units and 2,000 square feet of retail, including a courtyard, fitness center, rooftop terrace, and a private bar and lounge. The building will be constructed of two-tone bricks with large bay windows and balconies.


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Camden NoMa Phase II

Donohoe Construction is currently working on this building at 61 Pierce Street NE (map), which will be a companion to the Camden Noma Apartments at 60 L Street. Opening in 2017, there will be 405 apartments in a 15-story building. The WDG Architecture design will also have a gym, rooftop pool, landscaped courtyard and three levels of underground parking.


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Capitol Square Phases II-IV

In addition to the Hyatt Hotel on New York Avenue, JBG Companies, Hickok Cole Architects and Wood Partners are bringing more development to their Capitol Square project. The next stage will incude an industrial warehouse-style 13-story building at 33 N Street NE (map). After demolishing the office building currently on the site, Balfour Beatty Construction will construct 350 apartments, with a mix of studios, one- and two-bedrooms, bi-level suites and 9 micro-units. There will also be ground-floor retail, and a glass bay in the center of the building will give some residential units a loft feel. Two resident courtyards will flank the landlocked building, and there will also be a central courtyard that the gym and clubroom will overlook and open onto. Amenities will also include a resort-style rooftop deck with pool, cabanas and grills, dog park and co-working space. Expected delivery is early 2018.

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JBG Companies is also redeveloping next door at 51 N Street NE (map) for another phase of the Capitol Square project. This building will include 220 residences, 366,161 square feet of traditional and loft office space, and 30,543 square feet of retail. The mixed-use project also includes a 30,000 square-foot underground movie theater with seven screens. The Noma Meander park-walk will also mosey through the completed site. The building at 1300 First Street NE will also be part of the Capitol Square development.


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Eckington Yards

Boundary Companies, JBG and Eric Colbert and Associates are teaming up to bring 695 residential units across four buildings at 1611-1619 Eckington Place NE and 1500 Harry Thomas Way NE (map). The planned apartment mix will be 49 studios, 126 junior one-bedrooms, 229 one-bedrooms, 190 two-bedrooms, 21 three-bedrooms and 76 multi-level units that will be either two or three-bedrooms. There will also be up to 77,184 square feet of retail in two of the buildings, most of which will be in Flower Center North, a 110 foot-tall building. The other three buildings on the 3.1-acre site will be 75 feet tall. Quincy Place will be extended through the site, and the retail is envisioned as “maker space”, where local artisans will be plentiful. There will also be 331 parking spaces and 237 bicycle spaces.


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301 Florida Avenue NE

Construction is slated to begin later this year at 301 Florida Avenue NE (map). Ditto Residential, Zusin Development and Dep Designs architectural firm will build an eight-story, 71,000 square foot building with ground-floor retail and 56 apartments — a mix of studios and three- and four-bedrooms.


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300 M Street NE

The parking lot at 300 M Street NE (map) will soon be replaced with a LEED Silver-certified, 404,000 square-foot mixed-use building. There will be 9,000-12,900 square feet of ground-floor retail and 401 residential units, including some townhouse-style units with porches along M Street, west of Abbey Place. On the other side of Abbey Place will be a paved area for public use. The M Street Development Group, comprised of Wilkes Company, Square 772 Development Group and Hickok Cole, anticipates the project will be completed next year.


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Uline Arena

Although not a residential development, the redevelopment of Uline Arena at 3rd and M Streets NE, with flagship store REI taking up 51,000 square feet of the 70,000 square feet of retail, will serve as a new anchor for NoMa. The historic arena at 1140 3rd Street NE (map) is the first venue the Beatles performed at in the United States. When the Douglas Development-helmed renovation is complete, the building will also house 170,000 square feet of office space.


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Central Armature Redevelopment

Plans to redevelop the Central Armature Works building at 1200 3rd Street NE (map) were filed with the Board of Zoning Adjustment (BZA) last week, but UrbanTurf has been reporting on this project for over a year. Trammell Crow’s subsidiary High Street Residential will be helming the project, which will build atop a 100,000 square-foot platform over the 2.5-acre triangular site. Eventually, a 150-200 room boutique hotel, a condominium building with 150-200 units, and a 425-450 unit apartment building will rise level with the adjacent railroad tracks. There will also be 45,000 square feet of retail framing a plaza along 3rd Street, which will have tunnel-access to the NoMa-Gallaudet Metro station. The hotel lobby will be located on M Street with a public park and water feature. A total of 350 parking spaces will be underground, including electric car charging stations, and approximately 250 bicycle spaces will be accessible on the second floor. Shalom Baranes is also the architect on this project.


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301 N Street NE

The Capitol Self-Storage warehouse at 301 N Street NE (map) is still in pre-construction, as the developers are exploring landmark designation for the warehouse with its unique rooftop sawtooth monitors. The development team, led by Foulger-Pratt and Torti Gallas Urban, will preserve the existing facade will be preserved and the current building reconstructed to create 20,000 square feet of retail on the ground floor and office or retail space in the two upper floors. The warehouse will be abutted by two towers: one will be a boutique hotel with 150-175 rooms, and the other tower, fronting N Street, will contain 370 apartments. The adjacent Granger building will also be demolished.

NoMa Development

See other articles related to: noma apartments, noma, development rundown, development

This article originally published at http://dc.urbanturf.com/articles/blog/the_5151_units_headed_for_noma/11137

4 Comments

  1. Brett said at 2:17 pm on Monday April 25, 2016:

    All of these buildings, every single one of them is plain and boring. Not one unique design. It’s a shame we are reinventing the neighborhood with such poor architecture.

    In 20-30 years, we’ll look back on this decade like we now look back on the ugly architecture of the 70s and 80s.

  1. skidrowedc@gmail.com said at 4:07 pm on Monday April 25, 2016:

    Although architectural quality varies, I think that it’s more accurate to say that most of these are boring developments rather than boring architecture.  What most of these demonstrate is the result of a city policy not to restrict the size of developments in terms of FAR or lot occupancy.  The only serious density restriction in the core part of NoMa is the Congressional Height Act of 1910, which keeps most of these to 130’ and a few to 110’ or lower.

    You gotta feel for the architects asked to do yet another as-dense-as-possible giant box.  Some, of course, rise to the occasion better than others: 301 Florida & Camden NoMa Phase II are ill-proportioned and deal poorly with their immense bulk, whereas Central Armature and 300 M show potential to be pretty good.

    The real winners, though, are the projects away from the core of NoMa, usually bordering neighborhoods of rowhouses, that have zoning & other development restrictions.  Notably Eckington Yards, which has standard zoning density controls and is almost surgically-inserted into an existing neighborhood; and Uline Arena and 301 N, which incorporate sizable, interesting older buildings.  These three also have more interesting programs, incorporating unique retail, a boutique hotel, non-cookie-cutter office space, and so forth.

    I don’t see a repeat of the failure of 1970s architecture & planning, but I worry that a “neighborhood” of 250- and 300-unit buildings, almost all rentals, simply can never gel into an actual community, in a meaningful sense of the word.  I already sense, anecdotally from friends and acquaintances, that NoMa is a place that new residents who are in a hurry to find housing go.  It seems good on paper, after all—close-in, Metro stop, supermarket, and so forth.  But then after a year or so, they tire of the sterility and move to an actual neighborhood such as H Street NE, Shaw, Petworth, Capitol Hill, Anacostia, etc.  Possibly Storey Park could shift this dynamic in the core of NoMa—due to the park, not the dull architecture.  But real communities need 3-unit and 25-unit and 45-unit condo and apartment buildings; they need rowhouses; they need some of the retail to be in separate buildings.  To have some larger buildings is often a plus, but to have all larger buildings may prove fatal.

  1. pjohnl said at 2:46 pm on Tuesday April 26, 2016:

    You forgot one more building that’s already in the middle of construction: AVA NoMa at 55 M St NE.  Rendering can be found here: http://ktgy.com/work/ava-noma/

  1. Nena Perry-Brown said at 2:43 pm on Wednesday April 27, 2016:

    @pjohnl

    Thank you for bringing that to our attention! Adding it in now…

    -Nena

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